264 Reblog

2 days ago

meanwhilebackinthedungeon:

— Massimo Carnevale
The Northlands
114 Reblog

2 days ago

psaaok:

"How the Prince Arrived at the City of Immortality."
"The Prince Seeks Immortality."  The Crimson Fairy Book.  Andrew Lang, editor; H.J. Ford, illustrator.  1908.
Source
4994 Reblog

2 days ago

Le joli mai (Chris Marker, 1963) 

(Source: nightcricket, via powerdynamics)

183 Reblog

2 days ago

chimneyfish:

The Town, 1903
August Strindberg
144 Reblog

2 days ago

leprincelointain:

Norman Lindsay (1879-1969), Unknown Seas - 1922
181 Reblog

2 days ago

blackpaint20:

The last judgement
The descent into hell of the damned; the sinners are tormented by monsters, some are chained and dragged off while others are devoured by a hell mouth; round plate Engraving
Published by Philips Galle 
Print made by Hendrik Goltzius after Jan van der Straet 
c.1577 
Source; the British Museum
611 Reblog

2 days ago

"Capitalist realism insists on treating mental health as if it were a natural fact, like weather (but, then again, weather is no longer a natural fact so much as a political-economic effect). In the 1960s and 1970s, radical theory and politics (Laing, Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, etc.) coalesced around extreme mental conditions such as schizophrenia, arguing, for instance, that madness was not a natural, but a political, category. But what is needed now is a politicization of much more common disorders. Indeed, it is their very commonness which is the issue: in Britain, depression is now the condition that is most treated by the NHS. In his book The Selfish Capitalist, Oliver James has convincingly posited a correlation between rising rates of mental distress and the neoliberal mode of capitalism practiced in countries like Britain, the USA and Australia. In line with James’s claims, I want to argue that it is necessary to reframe the growing problem of stress (and distress) in capitalist societies. Instead of treating it as incumbent on individuals to resolve their own psychological distress, instead, that is, of accepting the vast privatization of stress that has taken place over the last thirty years, we need to ask: how has it become acceptable that so many people, and especially so many young people, are ill?"
Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative? (via funeral)

(Source: toxicwinner, via powerdynamics)

67 Reblog

2 days ago

vensuberg:

Paul Jamis, Brennus, 1900
Brennus was supposedly the name of the leader of the Celtic war-band that sacked Rome in the 5th century as well as the of band that sacked Delphi in the third century and went on to found Galatia in Asia Minor. Most likely it was a Celtic word for leader rather than a given name  I suppose this is meant to be Delphi from the view through the door  though the murals look rather magna Grecian. Brennus seems strangely oriental for a Gaul.
251 Reblog

2 days ago

catonhottinroof:

Georg Janny  
 Mythological Motif with Fauns on a Rocky Coast
161 Reblog

2 days ago

fleurdulys:

Steel - Georges Ames Aldrich
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